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The role of simulation in the reduction of medical errors
By Joan Spitrey
If you have taken a CPR class in the last few decades, you are familiar with Resusci Anne, the manikin used for learning CPR. The first Anne was invented to provide life-like training in the 1960s, and her soft helpless face was to inspire the rescuer to want to help the "dead" person. Today, the use of simulation has evolved way beyond the initial revolutionary thoughts of the first creators of Anne. The use of simulations is now an integral part of most healthcare providers' curricula.
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3-D-printed hearts help surgeons save babies' lives
CBS News
Replicas of the human heart that are made on 3-D printers could help save babies' lives, new research suggests. The heart replicas are designed to match every tiny detail of a baby's heart, so they can help surgeons plan where to cut tissue, reroute piping and patch holes in children with congenital heart defects, researchers said.
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Are robots taking over the — surgical — world?
The Vector
One of the greatest advances in medicine in the past decade has been the development of robotic surgery. When I first heard of the term “robotic surgery” as a 6th grader, I believed that actual robots would do surgery on human beings. I found out that this was not the case — robotic surgery is actually a type of surgery in which robots help surgeons operate on the patient. Robotic surgery is better referred to as robot-assisted surgery.
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Where has all the money gone in healthcare?
By Mike Wokasch
Healthcare costs keep going up with fingers often pointed at drug companies. At the same time, the pharmaceutical industry has decades of success delivering safer and more effective drugs to prevent and treat diseases that previously accounted for debilitating sickness and often death. What we seem to have lost in the complexities and lack of transparency of healthcare costs is the significant cost savings that should have resulted from drug treatment and prevention.
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Double mastectomy rates rise among women with early-stage breast cancer
The Wall Street Journal
The number of women with early-stage cancer in one breast who opt to have both breasts removed has risen sharply in the past decade, a new national study of 1.2 million patients showed. The rise is particularly steep among young women with very early, noninvasive tumors, according to the study, published in the journal JAMA Surgery.
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No benefit to CABG, mitral valve repair combo
MedPage Today
A year after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and mitral valve repair, patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation did not seem to benefit from having the two procedures versus having only CABG, researchers said here. Among patients who underwent CABG alone or CABG plus mitral valve repair, improvement in left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) — a marker of positive cardiac remodeling — was not statistically different between the two groups of patients, said Robert Michler, M.D., of Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues.
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Better options than surgeon-specific mortality data
Healthcare Professionals Network
Clinicians who see their own clinical outcomes data can use that information to promote and enhance patient safety. Although surgeon-specific mortality data (SSMD) is not generally used in the United States, it is used and publically released in the United Kingdom. Many surgeons there have rallied against SSMD, arguing that it leads the public to believe that the surgeon bears responsibility for all postoperative deaths regardless of clinical circumstance. They contend that SSMD under-appreciates the surgical team’s role and dismisses hospital staffing, infrastructure, and process as contributors to patient safety. Can one surgeon bear the entire burden when a patient dies during surgery?
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An Ohio Clinic performs near-total face transplant surgery for the 2nd time
The Plain Dealer
The Cleveland Clinic used Twitter to announce some big news – that they successfully transplanted 90 percent of a patient's face. It's the second near-total face transplant for the Clinic, where on Dec. 9, 2008 a team of surgeons performed the first such surgery in the United States. And this latest surgery is the first time that a face transplant recipient's eyesight has been preserved.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Research: American doctors are 'drowning in paperwork' (By Scott E. Rupp)
A heart simulator meant to help the real thing (The New York Times)
Pediatric surgeons using app to keep parents calm during surgery (KFOR-TV)
Hard-to-treat epilepsy? Surgical advances may help you (Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic)
2nd surgeries after breast cancer lumpectomy (HealthDay News via WebMD)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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