This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit December 30, 2014

Home   About   Membership   Education & Resources   Publications   AASPA APP   Contact Us


 


As 2014 comes to a close, AASPA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the AASPA Newsline a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 6, 2015.




1. The 4 basics of medical malpractice
By Joan Spitrey
From June 3: One of every healthcare provider's biggest fears is being named in a lawsuit. Although most did not go into the healthcare profession with the intent to harm, sometimes harm does occur. Often the only way to determine if harm was negligent is through the civil court system and, in extreme cases, the criminal courts. For a patient or family member to seek litigation, four components of medical malpractice must be met for the case to be viable. Every state has different civil litigation procedures; the general process is the same. This article aims to assist the reader in understanding the basic components that make up a medical malpractice case.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


2. Medical breakthrough: Bioengineered heart tissue
By Karen SC Ashley
From May 27: For patients with heart damage, the best treatment option right now is an organ transplant. But even then, the patient waiting list for an organ donor is seemingly endless. To confound matters, patients can encounter complications after heart transplantation. With new research, the ideal solution — repairing the heart — may soon be possible. To mimic the heart's powerful mechanical action, scientists needed to engineer an artificial cardiac tissue similar in elasticity and biological properties to the native heart. And the breakthrough scientists have long been waiting for has arrived — 3-D-engineered heart tissue that beats.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


3. Study: Artificial hearts may help patients awaiting transplants
By Joy Burgess
From May 13: Although experts still consider artificial hearts risky, recent research found that artificial hearts might prove helpful to patients with heart failure while they await heart transplants. Patients with severe heart failure — specifically those dealing with end-stage cardiomyopathy — may not live long enough to receive a heart transplant from an organ donor, but an artificial heart can help prolong life until a transplant becomes available.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


4. Why telemedicine is the future of healthcare
By Jessica Taylor
From May 27: Telemedicine is the hottest trend in the healthcare industry, and it is becoming more and more important to healthcare providers and patients around the world. According to medical professionals present at this year's ATA 2014 conference, telemedicine is the future of the healthcare industry. The trend is already backed by many hospitals and major health insurers, and the U.S. government recently endorsed telemedicine through Medicare and Medicaid.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


5. The role of simulation in the reduction of medical errors
By Joan Spitrey
From Nov. 25: If you have taken a CPR class in the last few decades, you are familiar with Resusci Anne, the manikin used for learning CPR. The first Anne was invented to provide life-like training in the 1960s, and her soft helpless face was to inspire the rescuer to want to help the "dead" person. Today, the use of simulation has evolved way beyond the initial revolutionary thoughts of the first creators of Anne. The use of simulations is now an integral part of most healthcare providers' curricula.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MISS AN ISSUE OF AASPA NEWS?
Click here
to visit AASPA archive page.


6. The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022
By Dorothy L. Tengler
From Sept. 30: On Monday, Oct. 6, 2009, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 800 points, closing below 10,000 for the first time since 2004. America was in recession. Since then, the nation's labor market has at least partially recovered. So far in 2014, the United States has added nearly 1.6 million jobs. And through 2022, employment is expected to grow by more than 15 million jobs, or by 11 percent.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


7. Blades inside the cabin: The next step in air medical services
By Mark Huber
From July 29: Earlier this year I wrote about the growing trend of performing airborne blood transfusions on trauma patients. What's the next logical step? Airborne surgery. Performing life-saving medical procedures in the air is not a new phenomenon — the U.S. Air Force has been doing it for years. Over the last decade, the practice has spread to the civil sector, mainly in specially-equipped airliners turned into air ambulances. But you don't need the massive cabin of a converted airliner to perform life-saving procedures.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


8. Where has all the money gone in healthcare?
By Mike Wokasch
From Nov. 25: Healthcare costs keep going up with fingers often pointed at drug companies. At the same time, the pharmaceutical industry has decades of success delivering safer and more effective drugs to prevent and treat diseases that previously accounted for debilitating sickness and often death. What we seem to have lost in the complexities and lack of transparency of healthcare costs is the significant cost savings that should have resulted from drug treatment and prevention.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


9. Regenerative cells: Hope for people disabled by spinal cord injury
By Dorothy L. Tengler
From Nov. 4: Stem cells have several unique properties that separate them from other cells. They can proliferate so that they are capable of replenishing themselves for long periods of time by dividing, and they are unspecialized cells that can differentiate into specialized cells such as nerve or heart cells. In addition to treating cancers such as leukemia, stem cells are used to treat other diseases such as Parkinson's, stroke, Alzheimer's, retinal diseases and spinal cord injuries
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


10. Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
From Oct. 7: According to reports, the patient is currently in isolation and listed in serious condition. As the story unfolded, it was discovered that the patient had presented to the hospital a few days prior with nondescript complaints. However, regrettably, the "information was not communicated to the full team," according to Dr. However, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost - human lives - but hopefully not in this case.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

AASPA Newsline
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 469.420.2661   
Contribute news

This edition of AASPA Newsline was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 23, 2014
Dec. 16, 2014
Dec. 9, 2014
Dec. 2, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063