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As 2013 comes to a close, AASPA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the AASPA Newsline a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan.7, 2014.




Surgeons develop app to practice surgery
BBC News
From June 5, 2013: Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practice surgery outside the operating theatre. The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices. Dr. Advait Gandhe, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level". The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.
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Surgeons find new body part explaining ACL knee injuries
Digital Journal
From Nov. 7, 2013: Two knee surgeons at University Hospitals Leuven have discovered a new body part in the human knee that may help doctors understand why many patients' knees tend to 'give away' even after treatment for ligament injuries. Research conducted over four years by Orthopedic surgeons Dr. Steven Claes and Professor Dr. Johan Bellemans of the University Hospitals Leuven, into serious anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has resulted in the two knee surgeons finding a new ligament.
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2012 NP & PA Salary Survey Results
Advance Healthcare Network
From Feb. 12, 2013: Unlike the falling salary numbers of 2011, nurse practitioners and physician assistants have regained momentum, reporting increased salaries and hourly wages across the board. In 2012, one profession made significant gains over last year's wages. The 2012 National Salary Survey of NPs & PAs found that the average full-time salary for PAs increased more than $7,000. NP salaries rose by less than half that amount, with an increase of about $2,500.
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Study links herbal supplement use prior to surgery with postoperative complications
News-Medical
From Sept. 10, 2013: Patients electing cosmetic facial procedures such as rhinoplasty at St. Louis Cosmetic Surgery may be less likely to suffer complications, thanks to the way doctors at the practice have responded to a new study. The study, performed by researchers Case Western Reserve University and published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, links herbal supplement use prior to surgery with postoperative complications. More than half of all facial surgery patients are taking some sort of herbal supplement, the study says.
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The pros and cons of robotic surgery
The Wall Street Journal
From Nov. 17, 2013: You need a hysterectomy, and the surgeon wants to do it robotically. Instead of working directly with his hands, he will sit at a console manipulating a set of robotic arms outfitted with tiny surgical instruments. Should you go for it? You'd be forgiven for some hesitation. There have been widely publicized horror stories, including patients who have bled out after a robotic instrument inadvertently nicked a blood vessel or those who have been injured in other ways, such as accidental punctures, tears or burns.
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The best and worst Master's degrees for jobs
Forbes
From June 8, 2013: Thousands of new college grads will enter the workforce this year, but with unemployment at 8.2 percent and underemployment near 18 percent, many will put off the taxing job search process and opt out of the weak job market to pursue graduate degrees. With this in mind, Forbes set out to determine which master’s degrees would provide the best long-term opportunities, based on salary and employment outlook.
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Texas surgeon performs groundbreaking robotic laparoscopic procedure on pregnant patient
News-Medical
From April 3, 2013: Performing surgery on a pregnant patient is a delicate matter. Risks to both mother and baby must be carefully weighed in every decision a surgeon makes. Recently, at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, a surgeon performed a groundbreaking robotic laparoscopic procedure on a 35-year-old pregnant patient whose cervix was too short to sustain a pregnancy. Dr. Sami Kilic, chief of minimally invasive gynecology and research at UTMB, is the first surgeon in the world reported to have used robotically assisted, ultrasound-guided laparoscopic surgery to successfully tighten a pregnant patient's incompetent cervix.
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Doctor performs first Google Glass-equipped surgery
PCMAG
From June 22, 2013: We've seen Google Glass in the shower; we've seen Google Glass at Disneyland; we've even seen Google Glass pop the question. Now, it's time for a little Google Gross. Dr. Rafael Grossmann, of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, recently performed his first Google surgery with Google Glass in tow. As far as we can tell, it's also the first such Google Glass-equipped surgery in the device's history – complete with a corresponding Google Glass Hangout (which wasn't open to the public, for those looking to tune in to a live surgery when the thrill of a YouTube video just isn't enough anymore).
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Robotic surgeries on the rise, but are there risks?
NBC News
From June 14, 2013: The majority of the hundreds of thousands of robotic surgeries performed in the U.S. each year are done safely. However, as use of the machine increases, so are reports of injuries: The U.S. Food and Drug administration has received more than 200 reports since 2007 of burns, cuts and infections – including 89 deaths – after robotic surgery. Rock Center’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman investigates Intuitive Surgical Systems and meets a woman who blames her devastating complication on the robot.
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Don't put that controller down -- Nintendo Wii trains future surgeons
Los Angeles Times
From Feb. 28, 2013: When you’re playing Nintendo you may be learning more than how to control a voracious gorilla, rescue a kidnapped princess or negotiate a go-cart course, according to a new study. You just may be learning skills to help you perform laparoscopic surgery. In a study posted online in the open access journal PLOS ONE, researchers from the department of surgical sciences at the University of Rome measured the surgical skills of students who trained on a Nintendo Wii.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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