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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          October 14, 2014

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ASPE NEWS


ASPE representation at an International Conference in Kazakhstan
By Melih Elcin, Hacettepe University, Turkey
Kazakh Medical University of Continuing Education (KazMUCE) organized the international Republican Conference on "Continuing Medical Education — A Guarantee of Safety and Quality of Medical Care," in collaboration with the Ministry of Health Care of Kazakhstan and NGO "Continuous Professional Development of Health Care Specialists." The conference was Sept. 25-27, in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
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Heads up, SP educators: Milestones and EPAs coming our way!
By Kris Slawinski, University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine
It was with great interest that I read the Needs Analysis Project proposal, written by ASPE's member liaison Dawn Schocken, in the Sept. 16 ASPE eNews. This past spring I participated in a Medical Education Day Retreat for faculty and curriculum staff at University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine (PSOM), where we focused on the imminent rollout of CEPAER Project, the Core EPAs (Entrustable Professional Activities) for Entering Residency, implemented by the AAMC, and how this initiative would affect our curriculum, students and residents.
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1st Ph.D. dissertation on SP methodology in Turkey
By Melih Elcin, Hacettepe University, Turkey
Medical schools have had SP programs in Turkey since 2004, and SPs have been widely used in 20 percent of medical schools. Nursing schools are not so familiar with SP methodology, and very few of them have recently implemented SP methodology in their undergraduate programs. Surprisingly, the first Ph.D. dissertation was recently completed in the field of nursing.
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Conference update!
By Cathy Smith, ASPE 2015 Conference Chair
The call for abstract proposals for the 14th Annual Association of Standardized Patient Educators (ASPE) is almost ready to launch! The conference will be June 14-17, 2015, at the Denver Marriott City Center in Denver. Day long immersion courses will be held on June 13, and pre-conference workshops will run the morning of June 14. These pre-conference sessions and immersion workshops will offer cutting edge best practices in SP methodology, delivered by experts in the field. Topics will be announced shortly!
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ASPE Website & Social Media Committee: ASPE news update
By Angela D. Blood, Rush University Medical College
The ASPE website has many new features and functions, including a newly operational Virtual Learning Center. The Virtual Learning Center contains many components, such as:
  • ASPE Terminology & Glossary, providing definitions for commonly used terms in the field;
  • Books & Reviews, listing books more relevant to SP educators;
  • Document Resource Bank, with materials submitted and shared among ASPE members;
  • Newsletters & Quarterly Archives, providing links to ASPE's current eNews, the past editions of ASPE eNews and past editions of the ASPE Quarterly.
  • Occupational Histories for Case Development, providing social context for SP cases which can be adapted to different clinical contexts.
  • And more!

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Medical students prepare for their careers with mannequins and actors
NJ.com
Would you buckle into a seat on an airplane being operated by a pilot whose training consisted of simply reading a book and doing some research? Most likely not. So, lying on a gurney with an untrained doctor hovering over you would probably be unsettling. Students at the New Jersey Medical School of Rutgers not only learn from books, but participate in hands-on training with standardized patients and mannequins at the Clinical Skills Center in Newark.
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Rethinking how we 'conference'
Psychology Today
Been to a conference lately, excited to learn from big name presenters, then found your brain throbbing by the end of the first day, unable to take in another idea? If so, you're not alone. Most conferences are put together according to formulas designed decades ago, in an era before blackberries and information overwhelm, with scant attention paid to how the brain digests new ideas. However with a few tweaks, conferences could be a lot more fun and useful for everyone.
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A culture of inclusiveness: Diversity matters in medical education
By Jonathan Ryan Batson
In the world of medicine, many on various committees and boards still believe diversity is not an issue. They think that a few seats at the table means that somehow we have all arrived and that the system is equal. That view is not only morally profane, but also incompetent. It shows the lack of interest to go further and increase both physical bodies for diversity as well as the the cultural dynamics of diversity in their student body and full-time faculty. A diverse education is needed to improve cultural competency and social awareness of the communities that many hope to serve.
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Simulation helps medical trainees better understand poor patients
UB Reporter
For one eye-opening afternoon, University of Buffalo resident physicians and medical students got a small taste of the challenges and frustrations patients living in poverty or on a low income face every day. Forty family medicine residents and 15 medical students recently took part in a simulation exercise designed to give them a realistic idea of what it takes to make ends meet when financial resources are scarce. Participants took on new identities as they personified written scenarios describing their new names, life circumstances and available resources.
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When patients read what their doctors write
National Public Radio
The woman was sitting on a gurney in the emergency room, and I was facing her, typing. I had just written about her abdominal pain when she posed a question I'd never been asked before: "May I take a look at what you're writing?" At the time, I was a fourth-year medical resident in Boston. In our ER, doctors routinely typed visit notes, placed orders and checked past records while we were in patients' rooms. To maintain at least some eye contact, we faced our patients, with the computer between us.
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What leaders don't know could hurt
Talent Management
Virtually every organization considers teamwork vital to its future success. Teamwork is pivotal in capabilities such as innovation, customer-centricity and agility, and is vital for talent management initiatives like diversity, collaboration and organization design. Fortunately, decades of research has unearthed practical guiding principles that have proven valid in different settings. Yet this research is often overlooked by talent leaders because it appears in "academic" journals.
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What do you do if your child has a condition that is new to science?
The New Yorker
Matt Might and Cristina Casanova met in the spring of 2002, as 20-year-old undergraduates at the Georgia Institute of Technology. At first, Cristina took no notice of him, but the two soon became friends, and that fall they began dating. Within a year, they were married. The couple had their first child, a son, on Dec. 9, 2007. After a few blissful weeks, the new parents began to worry. Matt and Cristina described Bertrand to friends as being "jiggly;" his body appeared always to be in motion, as if he were lying on a bed of Jell-O. He also seemed to be in near-constant distress, and Matt's efforts to comfort him "just enraged him," Matt says.
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Nurturing resilience, responsibility and resolve in medical students
Medical Teacher
Over the past decade, the medical education literature has recognized the need to develop a culture that nurtures well-being and resilience in students. However, the introduction of or increase in student fees precipitated a shift in higher education policies toward a consumer model of education. Importantly, it has altered the expectations of students and promoted a sense of "entitlement," rather than "striving" for something where success is not guaranteed.
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