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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          November 25, 2014

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ASPE NEWS


Blogs as medical communication resources
By Anna Lank, C3NY
Hello ASPE members,

As educational blogs are growing in our industry, I wanted to share with you the work we have done at C3NY to create a blog as an adjunct to our website, www.c3ny.org/blog/. I created the blog to emphasize points that we present to our students in a workshop that we offer monthly in order to clarify, elaborate on and to introduce readers who perhaps have not been exposed to this type of learning to the idea of good, clear communication skills, with an emphasis on skills evaluated on the USMLE Step 2 CS examination (mostly the ICE and CIS portions).

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Standardized patients help future doctors learn at Pennsylvania college
The Times Leader
The "patient" had abdominal pain, some blood in her urine and a room filled with half a dozen concerned people, all of them wearing white coats and asking questions. "When did the pain start?" 23-year-old Becca Cangemi of Scranton, Pennsylvania, wanted to know. "On a scale of 0 to 10, how bad is it?" "Do you take any medications?" William DeMayo, 24, of Ligonier asked. "Is there any possibility you could be pregnant?"
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The role of simulation in the reduction of medical errors
By Joan Spitrey
If you have taken a CPR class in the last few decades, you are familiar with Resusci Annie, the manikin used for learning CPR. The first Annie was invented to provide life-like training in the 1960s, and her soft helpless face was to inspire the rescuer to want to help the "dead" person. Today, the use of simulation has evolved way beyond the initial revolutionary thoughts of the first creators of Annie. The use of simulations is now an integral part of most healthcare providers' curricula.
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A lesson about patient communication learned in an improv class
GeriPal
My husband and I took a beginner's improv class not long ago, Danielle Chammas writes. Two of the most fundamental rules they taught about performing improv with a partner were: (1) never say "no" — it kills the storyline that you should be working with your partner to build. And (2) never say "yes, but..." because you might as well have just said "no." One setting that is certainly not protected from the "yes, but" is the hospital
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Nursing students hone skills in simulation with deaf patients
Medical Xpress
Studies show that healthcare providers enhance patient outcomes in high-risk situations when they participate in plenty of patient simulation exercises to mimic real-world scenarios. But what about situations that simply tend to make a patient-care provider unsure how to interact, such as when a deaf patient presents with an illness that is not life threatening? Recently, students at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to practice exactly that type of scenario.
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Why showing employees respect is so important
Inc.
It's incredibly important to convey respect when you're interacting with your employees. While that may seem obvious, unfortunately not nearly enough bosses do it. In a survey of more than 19,000 people by Harvard Business Review last year, 54 percent of respondents said they did not feel that they regularly got respect from their leaders. That lack of respect has huge consequences for employees, the survey found.
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Shifting focus to agile development
Talent Management
The term "agility" has been increasingly tossed around as a vital competency for organizations, teams and individuals. Yet misconceptions abound about what it means. At its broadest, agility is the ability to be responsive to change — change in competitive environments and customer needs, as well as change in workplace learning and performance. As an organizational capability, agility represents a virtuous cycle.
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On-site medical simulation delivers C-section baby at Michigan college
Michigan Live
Cracking jokes and quizzing the group of students watching a mock caesarean section, professor Donovan Traverse performed Delta College's first on-campus interdisciplinary medical simulation. The Nov. 12 procedure was the first time the Michigan community college brought students from two different studies — nursing and surgical technology — together to prepare for real-world medical situations.
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Hire self-motivated people — the single smartest thing a recruiter can do
ERE
If you are a corporate manager, you already know that you routinely spend a significant portion of your time trying to motivate your employees. Fortunately you can recapture every minute of that "motivation time" if you just do one simple thing: begin recruiting and hiring self-motivated employees. These type of employees are not a myth. They are called self-motivated or intrinsically motivated people. Imagine what it would be like to have a team full of employees who not only automatically did the work that they were assigned but who would also proactively seek out new work that needed to be done.
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Bridging healthcare's innovation-education gap
Harvard Business Review
Despite the excellence of its delivery, insurance and technology components, the healthcare sector in the United States is plagued with sky-high costs, unequal access and erratic quality. This predicament continues to create a major drag on the U.S. economy. According to an analysis by McKinsey, while the productivity of the U.S. computer and semiconductor industry grew by 7.6 percent per year in the 1990-2007 period, the productivity of the U.S. healthcare industry dropped by 0.8 percent annually. To change this grim statistic, the pace of innovation must dramatically increase.
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