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Toyota hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to be available in 2016
HNGN
Toyota Motor Corp. will start building hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in mid-December, earlier than originally planned, according to a report from Japan. The automotive manufacturer first revealed its plans to make hydrogen cars last year at the Tokyo Motor Show, according to NBC News. The company has suggested that it is getting involved in the hydrogen car market in order to meet stricter Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) standards.
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Researchers develop fuel cells for increased airplane efficiency
Phys.org
Washington State University researchers have developed the first fuel cell that can directly convert fuels, such as jet fuel or gasoline, to electricity, providing a dramatically more energy-efficient way to create electric power for planes or cars. Led by Professors Su Ha and M. Grant Norton in the Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture, the researchers have published the results of their work in the May edition of Energy Technology. A second paper on using their fuel cell with gasoline has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Power Sources. The researchers have made coin-sized fuel cells to prove the concept and plan to scale it up.
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Hyundai releases its fuel cell vehicle
Hydrogen Fuel News
South Korean automaker Hyundai has finally made its hydrogen-powered Tucson ix35 available in California. This represents the first commercial debut of the company's fuel cell vehicle in the world, though the ix35 will only initially be available for lease. Hyundai has been working tirelessly to promote its new fuel cell vehicle, highlighting the benefits of hydrogen fuel and how it can be used in clean transportation. While fuel cells have yet to win the support of the majority of consumers, automakers are all but convinced that the future of transportation will be powered by fuel cell technology.
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Ice in fuel cells imaged directly for the first time
Phys.org
Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have succeeded in imaging the distribution of frozen and liquid water in a hydrogen fuel cell directly for the first time. They applied a new imaging technique that uses successively two beams with different neutron energies to distinguish between areas with liquid water and those with ice extremely reliably. The method therefore opens up the prospect of studying one of the main problems of using fuel cells to power vehicles: ice can clog the pores in the fuel cells and affect their performance.
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Human urine can be used for fuel cells
Digital Journal
The world produces billions of gallons of urine each day, which is enough to fill 4,200 Olympic swimming pools. Most of us will label it as waste, but scientists are hoping to use urine to generate power for our society. A group of scientists from Korea University outlined a plan to use carbon atoms from human urine to produce electricity. This would be done by replacing expensive platinum used in current fuel cells with carbon found in human waste naturally, they claim.
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New hydrogen fuel buses come to California
Hydrogen Fuel News
SunLine Transit Agency, a transit operator based in Riverside County, California, will be holding a ribbon-cutting ceremony in order to honor the winners of its SunLine Student Art Contest. The ceremony will also unveil the organization's new hydrogen-powered buses, which will be clad in the winning art from those that have won SunLine's contest. The buses are powered by hydrogen fuel cells, which use hydrogen to generate electrical power.

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Researchers develop new catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells
Hydrogen Fuel News
Researchers from the Kyushu University in Japan have made a significant breakthrough in fuel cell technology. The researchers have developed a new catalyst that promises to be less expensive and more capable than conventional models. Most modern fuel cells are equipped with catalysts comprised of platinum. This material is favored for its electrochemical properties, but is also notoriously expensive.

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Volcano coughs up new fuel cell catalyst
CleanTechnica
This one begins like a chapter from Jules Verne's novel The Mysterious Island and ends up with a new fuel cell catalyst that could lead to cost-competitive fuel cell vehicles. The new catalyst is based on an enzyme called H2ase S–77, which was discovered on Kyushu Island in Japan at an active volcano called Mt. Aso, by a researcher from Kyushu University. The low-cost angle comes in because H2ase S–77 (short for hydrogenase S-77) could replace platinum, which is the very expensive but highly efficient current "gold standard" for fuel cell catalysts.

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Stacking up: Making hydrogen fuel-cell manufacturing viable
The Engineer
It seems like the ideal solution. Hydrogen — the most abundant element in the universe — has the potential to fuel our cities, leaving behind nothing but water and heat as a by-product. But while it appears to be a promising technology, this vision of widespread hydrogen-fuelled homes has always been just out of reach. For decades, the problem has been the high cost of fuel cells required to drive the process.
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Fuel cells utilized to produce electricity from process industry by-product hydrogen
Nanowerk
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a pilot-scale power plant based on fuel cells that utilizes by-product hydrogen from the process industry. The power plant has been in operation at Kemira Chemicals Oy's site in Finland since January 2014. The system produces electricity from hydrogen generated as a by-product of a sodium chlorate process at a high electric efficiency and is the first of its kind in the Nordic Countries.
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