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NASA is catalyst for hydrogen technology
Phys.org
NASA answered a call to help the world's largest aerospace company develop a better way to generate electricity for its aircraft. Instead, it wound up helping a very small technology company to thrive. Here's what happened. Aerospace mega-giant Boeing approached NASA with the idea of using fuel cells to provide electricity for its planes instead of the onboard generators commonly in use. Those generators run on the same jet fuel that powers a plane's flight, but burning jet fuel to drive a small generator is inefficient.
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Toyota bets big on future of fuel cells
Times Colonist
California's ambitious zero-emission vehicle goal is for 1.5 million hydrogen, all electric, and plug-in electric vehicles to be cruising the roads by 2025. Toward that goal, the state is spending $200 million to build 100 hydrogen refuelling stations, most of them clustered in Los Angeles and around the San Francisco Bay Area. There's just one problem: Where are the hydrogen fuel cell cars?
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New research could save chemical industry $1.4 billion in energy costs
Eco-Business
The global chemical industry could save $1.4 billion a year in electricity costs with a new technology being developed by Singapore researchers that can recycle waste hydrogen. This initiative by researchers from the Nanyang Technological University is one of seven research projects focusing on energy solutions in renewables and micro-grids, which received $15 million in funding from the Singapore government recently.
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Will commuters pay more for a hydrogen fuel cell car than a traditional electric?
Hydrogen Fuel News
HydrogenFuelNews.com has released the results of its latest survey concerning fuel cell vehicles. The survey asked the site's readers if they believed fuel cell vehicles would be as popular as traditional electric vehicles and whether or not they would pay more for a fuel cell vehicle than a hybrid car. The results suggests that the majority of respondents do not believe that fuel cell vehicles will become popular any time soon, but the survey also suggests that respondents would be willing to pay more for these vehicles.
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Artificial photosynthesis innovations
Institute for Ethics & Emerging Technologies
The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs.

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New Flyer teams with CALSTART to build a hydrogen fuel bus
Hydrogen Fuel News
New Flyer Industries, a bus manufacturer based in Canada, has announced that it has begun working with CALSTART, a non-profit clean transportation organization. Together, the two organizations will develop a new, 60-foot battery fuel cell hybrid bus that will be part of New Flyer's Xcelsior X60 platform. This will be one of the largest hybrid buses that has been built and put into operation in North America. The bus will use both a hydrogen fuel cell and lithium ion batteries.

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Hydrogen-powered forklifts gaining prominence
Cambridge Times
Hydrogen fuel cells are proving to be a viable replacement for lead-acid batteries used in forklifts at warehouses, according to Keith Wipke, a senior engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States. The technology works by replacing traditional lead-acid batteries in forklifts and other equipment with hydrogen fuel cells that can be refilled by on-site tanks.

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Car makers prepare to shift to hydrogen fuel cells
Los Angeles Times
Concerned about slow sales of electric cars and plug-in hybrids, automakers are increasingly betting the future of green cars on hydrogen fuel cell technology. Even Toyota, maker of the popular Prius gas-electric hybrid, will use hydrogen instead of batteries to power its next generation of green vehicles. "Today, Toyota actually favors fuel cells over other zero-emission vehicles, like pure battery electric vehicles," said Craig Scott, the company's national manager of advanced technologies.
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Sainsbury's prepares for hydrogen transport with U.K.'s first supermarket dispenser in London
Retailer Times
Sainsbury's has announced the U.K.'s first supermarket forecourt hydrogen dispenser will be located at its Hendon store by the end of the year. Working with a global leader in hydrogen infrastructure, Air Products, the new dispenser will join a network of existing stations helping bring a breath of fresh air to residents and visitors in London and the South East, the retailer claims.
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New European venture will help support hydrogen fuel buses
Hydrogen Fuel News
Ballard Power Systems, a leading developer of hydrogen fuel cells, has partnered with Van Hool, a manufacturer of buses, in order to launch a new joint venture called European Service and Parts Center. The venture will be focused on providing services to buses equipped with fuel cells, with these services being made available in November of this year. The venture will primarily support buses that have been developed by Van Hool.
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Japan looks to hydrogen as main energy source in future
Business Standard
Japan is looking at hydrogen as a main energy source in future to power its transport systems and to generate electricity, as the economic giant makes an effort to reduce its dependency on fossil fuels and nuclear energy. In the Kitakyushu city, a unique project is already underway in which hydrogen generated during iron manufacturing processes can be utilized to provide energy to vehicles as well as homes.
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