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Former Lodging Engineer '1st Person' Harry Hobbs provides Scientific American unique perspective on hotel energy storage:
Scientific American
Cities become key proving ground for commercial energy storage technologies
Advances in energy storage could help make wind and solar power a mainstay of our electricity system by taking root not only in the Great Plains and the Mojave Desert but also Park Avenue high-rises and urban data centers. Some of the most compelling needs for storing energy like digital bits are now coming from businesses and utilities in cities, turning them into a crucial proving ground for a technology many consider vital for the electricity grid of the future.

Read the 1st Person feature on Harry Hobbs in Lodging Engineer.
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Treatment system slashes buildings' water, electricity use
Environmental Leader
Property developers Lerner, Carr and WC Smith, and Washington, D.C., historic hotel Willard InterContinental have installed water treatment technology from Silver Bullet to cut water, electricity and chemical usage in their cooling towers for air-conditioning. Lerner tested the system for 16 months in its cooling towers and condensing systems, says it saved "considerable" water and electricity — a Silver Bullet spokesperson estimates the property manager saved 45 millions gallons since installing its first system in 2011 — and expects to save millions of gallons of water and thousands of kilowatt hours of electricity over time, once it installs the system in all of its D.C.-area properties.
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Chemical companies seek to limit federal green building
Bloomberg
Chemical companies are lobbying the U.S. Congress to limit government use of proposed, tougher green-building codes in the hope that alternative standards may be adopted. The U.S. Green Building Council, which received $3 million from Google, Inc. last year to promote non-toxic materials, has proposed updating its voluntary but widely used Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, standards to give credit to builders that avoid chemicals that pose health risks.
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New OSHA app meant to keep workers cooler
WEKU-FM
As they begin their day, outdoor workers some southeast states will stand down at construction and other work sites. The time will be spent stressing the dangers posed by summer heat. Bill Cochran with the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration says the voluntary break is not restricted to construction workers.
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Report calls for more storm-readiness measures
Crain's New York Business
In "Risk & Resiliency After Sandy," a task force, whose members include New York City's leading architects, contractors, and engineers, lays out four major recommendations for improving building readiness for storms. These include bolstering the power grid, revising building codes, streamlining emergency response and expanding the mass transit infrastructure.
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Study: US construction is getting safer
Construction Digital
While many construction trades consistently land among the most dangerous jobs, the numbers do seem to be improving. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported a drop in on-the-job fatalities from 802 in 2010 to 781 in 2011. It's not just fatality numbers that are improving, either. Over the same four-year period, the total number of recordable injuries dropped from 4.7 per 100 workers in 2008 to 3.9 per 100 in 2011.
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NAHLE launches NEW professional certification CDOE
NAHLE
NAHLE announces its newest certification program for select-service property engineers. The new program has several common chapters taken from our full-service program and several new chapters, including PTAC Units, Mold & Mildew, and Low-Rise Wood-Frame Construction among others. The CCE program is also self-paced and has three sectional tests: management, building systems and building envelope and grounds. The new certification keeps the CCE designation and our full-service program is picking up the new title, "Certified Director of Engineering" (CDOE). NAHLE Executive Director Robert Elliott said, "Our new program is tailored for select service properties. We believe our professional certification programs fill a niche in the industry for an independent third-party provider of education and training. The knowledge one retains from our program is transferable across hotel brands and establishes the engineer as the property's front-line defense for daily asset management."
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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